Tag Archives: Need

College Admissions – Why Students Need a Good College Admissions Strategy

Getting into college these days is more than just “fill out the application” and wait for word from the college. Years ago, that may have been the case, but it isn’t any longer. More students are going to college than ever before and that means more competition. AND, those same students are more active than ever before — great grades, lots of activities and community service are normal and expected.

That’s often the most difficult part for parents to understand. Just because your child has great grades and good SAT scores, doesn’t necessarily mean he or she is Ivy League material or a shoo-in at every college. So, when strong grades, solid SAT scores and tons of activities are the norm, your problem still remains: how to stand out from the crowd.

The solution is to have a compelling message to deliver to the schools and a plan to communicate it consistently to the right people. It’s going to help you stand apart from the rest of the crowd! And, the key to a good college admissions strategy is your message.

College admissions folks love anything that can help them identify your strengths and communicate them quickly and easily. Your message should make you more “memorable” to the college admissions representative who reads your application. If you have really zeroed in on the right message, it will likely be supported by others — such as your teachers who will be writing your recommendations!

Done well, your message and the strategy you use to deliver it can be powerful tools to get you noticed and in at a particular college, as it did for one of my students, Anita.

Anita’s dad asked me to work with his daughter because she wanted to get in to a highly selective school that had a top-notch reputation in the medical sciences. Exactly the kind of place that fit in with her career goals of following in her physician-father’s footsteps. Anita was a strong candidate for for the school, but she and her dad didn’t want to leave anything to chance.

Anita and I worked together to develop her message to the schools so she would stand out as much as possible from the thousands of others in the admissions office. Together, we developed her strategy to reinforce her two unique qualities — her love of and desire to study math and science plus her extraordinary accomplishments in classical Indian dance.

Her message boiled down to how she was equally at home on the stage and in front of a Bunsen burner. It was concise and, most of all, it was memorable.

She was able to incorporate this message into every part of the college admissions process — as part of her main essay; she was able to integrate it into her interviews. The clarity and consistency of her message made a great impression, as evidenced by comments made by the admissions officer after she was accepted!

Having a comprehensive plan and a strong admissions strategy kept Anita in control of the admissions process rather than letting the admissions process control her. Isn’t that more appealing than “throwing together your applications’ and “hoping for the best”? So, get started taking control…

Your Get NOTICED, Get IN, Get MONEY Assignment:

1. Create your message.

2. Identify who you will communicate your message to.

3. Start communicating that message — consistency is the key!

Jeanmarie Keller, is a college admissions and financial aid expert and creator of the Get NOTICED, Get IN, Get MONEY System, the proven step-by- step program that shows you exactly how to get NOTICED in the college admissions office, get IN at the colleges right for you, and get MONEY to help pay the college bill. To claim your F.R.E.E. audio CD: “Finding Cash For College” and receive weekly admissions and financial aid tips and strategies, go to http://www.JeanKeller.com

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Thinking of Building Solar Panels? You Don’t Need a PhD

You may be thinking of building solar panels to create power for your home, your yacht/boat or maybe your RV. You may also be thinking that for this to happen you are going to have to get a degree in Electrical Engineering. Hopefully you will be glad to know that anyone with the simplest grasp of DIY should be able to build a solar panel, without spending a fortune on materials, equipment and the added expense of getting someone to install them for you.

If you really want to build your panels, the best starting place would be to learn all you can before your start spending your hard earned money. There are plenty of manuals that will take you through the whole process of building a solar panel, these should include detailed photographs and diagrams of what exactly you need to do, and the best ones will include videos. Working your way through the manual will save you time in the end and give you a better chance in succeeding. Many of the products today will include a “shopping list” of exactly what you need to buy and where the best places to get the materials you need. You should be able to find many of the materials you need in your local hardware store, an if not the internet would be the next best place.

What you will be learning is how to how to connect up solar cells to create solar panels, and then how to connect these solar panels together. Your first attempt shouldn’t be to create a system that will power your house, start off small. In a day you should be able to build your first panels that would give you enough power for a couple of small appliances. Once you have gained the knowledge and experience of building that first panel, you can start to build more panels, connect them together and power more appliances. In the end you may be able to power your entire home and saving money.

Another important piece of knowledge, is how to store your electricity. It’s no good to create electricity during the day, but then not having enough stored to power your appliances in the evening. Any decent manual will tell you how to build and create a system made from batteries to store the electricity you have created, during low periods.

Learning to build your own solar panels, will save you money, but only if you have spent the time learning exactly what you need to do from beginning to end, so you don’t end up wasting more of your money than you need to. By also taking the time to learn and build your panels, in the event of any problems you will be the best qualified person to fix it.

Gavin Dye is the webmaster at Solar Power 4u where you can learn about solar power and solar panels. You can also find the best resources for information on building solar panels.

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Do You Need A Degree To Get A Medical Transcription Job?

Many people want to become medical transcriptionists but don’t know how to get started. If you ask around, you probably hear you need to go to school first, as employers rarely train people who have no background in medical transcription anymore.

Does that mean you have to get a degree? How long is that going to take?

Fortunately, you don’t have to get a degree in medical transcription. It’s not going to take most people 2-4 years to learn what they need to know to work as a medical transcriptionist. It’s perfectly acceptable to take classes strictly about medical transcription. You can even do so online.

There are a number of good schools to learn medical transcription. There’s an even bigger number of really bad schools to learn from. Not every school you hear about will do even an adequate job of training you for this kind of work. Many do a downright poor job, even if you’re a highly dedicated student.

Your first consideration with a medical transcription school is that it is Approved by the AHDI. The AHDI is the Association for Healthcare Documentation Integrity, and their approval of programs is solely based on the quality of their medical transcription training. Anything else the school offers is not relevant.

That approval increases the odds that employers will think well of you as a graduate. No guarantees, as you have to prove that you actually learned to be a medical transcriptionist rather than simply did the minimum to pass the courses. If you don’t really learn the skills, no one is going to want to hire you, and that’s not a fault of the school if the school is otherwise a good one.

Your next consideration is often financial. How are you going to pay for it all? It’s not like most of us have a lot of money waiting to be spent, after all.

Balance what you’re spending on your education with the odds that you’ll get a job in a reasonable time frame after graduation. Once again, no guarantees, as it depends on the economy, which jobs you apply for, how well you learned the skills and so forth. A good school is at least $ 1500, and over $ 3000 is not unheard of or completely unreasonable.

Don’t worry about what sort of certification you’ll get with graduation. You may have heard of a Certified Medical Transcriptionist (CMT), but that’s not what you’ll be after graduation no matter where you attend. A CMT has at least two years of experience and has passed a test administered by AHDI. It’s not easy and it is not necessary in order to work as a transcriptionist.

Depending on how fast you learn and which course you take, expect to need 4-12 months to learn to be a medical transcriptionist. It can take longer, and a few people can do it in less time. Going too fast risks not learning well enough, so don’t rush it. At least you aren’t having to go for a degree before you can work.

Stephanie Foster created http://www.medicaltranscriptionbasics.com/ for people wanting to start a medical transcription career. Learn why attending an AHDI Approved medical transcription school is a good idea at her site.

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Do You Need an English Degree to Write Well?

If I had a dollar for every time someone told me he or she has difficulty communicating in writing, I’d have… a lot of dollars. When I ask why, the response is invariably the same: “I just don’t understand writing, and English, and grammar, and all that stuff.” For some reason, people seem to think that knowing “all that stuff” is necessary for learning to write well.

Who knows all the rules, the meanings of all the terms, the linguistic foundations of writing strategies? Think about the people who have tried to teach you “all that stuff.” You will probably recall high school English teachers. You might think about college English professors. They have English degrees. The conclusion, therefore, is that you need to have an English degree to write well.

This is not true. Understandable, but wrong.

Writing books and guides do little to change this perception. Without the benefit of a strong background in English terms, grammar, concepts, etc., you may quickly become frustrated, confused, bored, lost, or simply turned off. For example, I was recently discussing The Elements of Style, the writing guide by Strunk and White. I like this writing guide and was describing its value to me. Someone replied that she didn’t like it because she needed a grammar book to understand it. Her statement pointed out a major problem with most writing instruction.

The first problem is that many writing books, courses, and other instruction expect people to know the grammar, the writing terminology, the concepts, etc. They freely use them while trying to impart writing strategies. People who don’t know them will not be able to take full advantage of the instruction.

The second problem is that ineffective instruction separates the academic knowledge from the writing strategies. For example, a book on writing clearly might have a separate section in the back on grammar. Then, if a person gets confused about a term, he will have to stop reading about the strategies and spend some time studying the grammar section. Other books, courses, etc. spend a lot of time on the terminology and grammar before they show you how to use this knowledge. It’s one or the other. They don’t teach the terminology in context of the writing strategies when that knowledge is relevant.

My top three writing resources are guilty of these two problems. I already mentioned Elements of Style, which has a separate section on grammar and usage. Line by Line by Cook is a powerful book on writing well, but the author assumes you already know the grammar and terminology. Williams, the author of my third favorite book, Style: 10 Lessons in Clarity and Grace, includes an appendix defining many terms used in the 10 lessons. Their assumption is that most people already know the terminology and grammatical concepts, so they put that information at the end in case any uninformed people happen to read their books.

Maybe this is true. But this isn’t appropriate for the typical person who didn’t get an English degree but still needs to communicate in writing. (You can get more information about these three books by searching Amazon or by clicking their image on hostileediting dot com.)

In short, the books do not provide effective writing instruction because they have a faulty instructional model. The instructional model is not aligned with the way people learn. The woman who needed a grammar book to understand Elements is a good example: the problem is instruction, not the learner.

I have a master’s degree in English, and I have spent over 15 years working in local and state education agencies designing and implementing learning systems. This gives me a unique perspective on teaching writing. I’ve learned three instructional strategies along the way that apply to writing instruction.

Teach necessary terminology and concepts in context of the primary focus. This means that background information and supporting concepts should not be separate from the primary instruction. For example, if I am going to teach people to put commas around appositive phrases, and they don’t know what appositive phrases are, then this is the time to teach them-not later, not before, but now. This also means that I don’t teach about different types of phrases because they are not relevant to the main topic at this time.
Provide new information in old terms. This means using common, everyday language to help people understand new concepts, i.e., using words people already know. This also means using examples that are relevant to the learners’ experiences. Research on learning is very clear about this: people learn better when they can relate new content to their lives.
New concepts need to be reinforced multiple times. Just explaining something once isn’t effective. The explanations need to be employed several or more times, and in different ways.

Sometimes, the grammar terms are important. They can be very useful to discussing writing strategies and for summarizing concepts. However, they, too, can be taught following the three strategies above. First, they are introduced only when relevant to the current topic. If they are not relevant, they are not discussed. Second, they are taught using simple terms and explained according the learner’s experiences. Once the learner has grasped the basic ideas, they are explained and used multiple times. If the terms are important, then the instructor has the responsibility to ensure that the learner understands and can apply them.

These three strategies are not the result of personal speculation; I’m no armchair philosopher inventing ideas without research or testing. Abundant research literature on learning espouses these ideas. More important, at least to me, is the feedback from students in my adult education writing courses and from people who have purchased our writing guides.

I implement these strategies and pay careful attention to how people respond. Here are some word for word samples of their responses.

“The instructor used words I could understand.”
“I like very much the way Mr. Bowman presents his example.”
“This was the class I have been waiting for.”
“Written concisely in plain English…”
“… very easy to understand.”
“… explanations [are] clear, concise, and very informative…”

As demonstrated by this feedback, this 3-part approach works: teach concepts in context of the primary instructional focus, teach new content using common language, and reinforce new learning.

Who can use these strategies for effective writing instruction? The answer to this question is pretty simple. If you provide writing instruction in any way, these tips are for you: elementary and secondary education teachers (K-12), college level writing instructors, writing workshop teachers and facilitators, writing book writers, bloggers on writing, editors, etc.

Communication skills are important, and people do need to write well. With so many available resources on writing, why do so many people still struggle with writing? The problem is the instruction, not the learner. With these three strategies, instructors will provide effective learning opportunities, and you, the learners will learn to write and communicate effectively.

David Bowman is the Owner and Chief Editor of Precise Edit, a comprehensive editing, proofreading, and document analysis service for authors, students, and businesses. Precise Edit also offers a variety of other services, such as translation, transcription, and website development.

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Do You Need a Degree to Be a Freelance Writer?

This is a long-standing debate between writers, the answers is yes, and no. There are jobs on job boards that do require a degree and others that require an advanced degree. What you need to write for clients is a good working knowledge of English spelling, grammar, and punctuation. If you are not up to par, take a course at a community college or university. Find a grammar book, read it, and do the exercises in it. Read everything you can get your hands on. You need to have the basics of the English language down before you can write for a client. Clients expect perfect English in their assignments for freelance writers.

The elitist writers think you should have a degree in English or Journalism to be a freelance writer. If you have one, fine, but it really isn’t necessary to pick up writing assignments. You do need to be a good writer, which means using the language correctly and always striving to improve your writing with every piece of copy you write. This also goes for all writers. If you are ever satisfied with your writing, you will become stagnant and become lazy in your writing. Your writing will reflect this, and the client will notice.

A writer needs to be creative in their writing, try to eliminate passive sentences, watch verb subject agreement, typos, grammar, punctuation, and possibly keyword density if the client wants SEO web content. You can learn all of this. It just takes time and effort on the part of the want to be freelance writer. With practice and reading, studying how writers put sentences together, and learning or refreshing the basics of the English language, anyone can become a writer. This freelance writer knows a person that is dyslexic and she is a published author. It does come down to how bad to you want it.

Yes, a degree is a nice thing to have, if you can afford it. If you can’t, read grammar books, Basic English books, try taking a course. The degree does hold more weight when you apply for a job. Your writing skill will hold all the weight you need for most jobs. What a writer needs is a portfolio of well-written copy they can show to a prospective client.

If you want to become a freelance writer, learn about what freelance writing is about, and make sure that you are up to date on the rules of English; for which there are many style guides. If you plan to submit articles to magazines, make sure to read the writers guidelines. You would be surprised how many queries and stories never make it because of writers submitting the wrong material or not following the guidelines completely.

Robert Medak
Freelance Writer/Editor
http://stormywriter.com

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Oil jobs and oil gas jobs – 4 answers you need to know

Before you take up oil jobs and oil gas jobs, it is important for you to know this industry well and the type of job you are going to do. Only when you are satisfied with the answers to some basic questions should you take these jobs up. There is no fun doing a job that you don’t enjoy and you don’t want a situation when you start working in an oil rig and not enjoy it. Given below are answers to four basic questions that people generally ask about working in oil rigs.

1.  What is the basic requirement for oil jobs and oil gas jobs?

The most basic requirement of oil jobs and oil gas jobs is that you have basic education. If you have cleared high school you can start your career in the oil industry in the basic level. You can work as a roughneck or roustabout and go about doing drilling and extraction. As you gain experience, you have the chance to go up the corporate hierarchy and reach supervisor levels.

With a diploma in mechanical or electrical engineering, you can also start your career in the oil jobs and oil gas jobs. Again, your experience will decide your position in the hierarchy.

If you have a university degree or doctorate, you can even work in the departments of geosciences or research and development. There are other job openings in data analysis, medical field and even as a steward or a chef. There is no dearth of job openings in the oil industry.

2.  Do I get trained?

All employees of oil companies go through intensive training programs on safety programs and operations. The oil industry always remains in focus due to the environmentalists and human rights groups and no company can take a chance related to environmental damages as well as accidents. Apart from this fact, injuries to workers can also result in operational downtime and lawsuits.

Training happens when you start your oil jobs and oil gas jobs and it is an ongoing process. Most oil companies mandate that you go through certain hours of training every year.

3.  How much can I earn?

To start off, you can earn close to $ 50,000 a year plus benefits. As you go up the ladder, both the salary and the benefits keep on increasing.

4.  How are the living conditions?

It is true that living conditions are sometimes cramped and there is a lack of privacy but the conditions are not too dissimilar to college dorms. Once you get used to the conditions, you adjust naturally. It is no big deal.

With these questions answered, you have probably understood more about oil jobs and oil gas jobs and the requirements of these jobs. Now it is time for you to decide whether you want to do these jobs or not. If you want further information, you can use the Internet and search for more. What matters in the end that you are happy working in oil rigs.

There are some pertinent questions about Oil jobs and oil gas jobs that you need answers for before you take them up.

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When You Need a New Direction You Should Consider Golf Career College

Millions of people across the country have found themselves out of a job and with no prospects available to them. Not because they are unqualified or unworthy, but because their field of employment has shed jobs that it will never regain. In the first few months of the recession, industries were faced with a challenging choice: shed workers and struggle on or don’t fire anyone and perish. Those who chose to try and move on with a reduced labor force soon found new technologies and sources of labor to compensate for the lost personnel, and quickly discovered that these alternate sources of support were less expensive than an employee. However, there is one field that is guaranteed to never trade out American workers for cheap foreign labor or technology, and that is the field of golf. Golf continues to be a multibillion dollar a year industry and is always looking for eager and enthusiastic personnel to man the thousands of courses around the country. Why not look into golf career college as a way to get your career, and your life, back on track?

Virtually everyone who works in the field of golf says the same thing: it is the best job they could ever want. Think about it: you get to be outside, on beautifully manicured properties. You get to meet new and interesting people every day. And depending on the specific area of golf you go into, you can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a year – or more!

Golf career college is fun, affordable, and prepares you for one of hundreds of jobs in the golf industry. From groundskeeper to professional player to marketing specialist, the world of golf jobs is diverse and exciting.  In golf school, you will learn the basics of the game, including the rules, history, and how to play. You will also learn the nuances of course design and maintenance, as well as basic managerial know-how. The information you learn in golf school is so rich and applicable to daily life, everyone should have to attend!

In less than two years, you can be graduating with your Associate of Science degree in Golf Management, a credential that can open doors for you literally around the world. Golf is a seventy six billion dollar a year industry worldwide and employs over two million people in the United States alone. That means that while professionals with their MBAs are struggling to pay for their groceries, individuals who have a Golf Management degree have more than two million options open to them in the United States alone. With the numbers stacked up like that, it is really an easy choice, isn’t it?

If you have any reservations about investigating what a golf career college could do for you, ask yourself the following questions: Do I enjoy being outdoors? Do I enjoy achieving and being my best? Do I enjoy meeting new people and having exciting opportunities open to me? Do I want to find employment in a career that is virtually recession proof? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then there is a very good chance that golf school could be a great choice for you. What are you waiting for? Programs are filling up, and you don’t want to miss out on an opportunity to start your great career as soon as possible!

Sandy Winslow likes to share ideas about career changes. Still trying to find your stride in this challenging economy? Then you should consider going to golf career college where you can train for a recession proof job.

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You Don’t Need an Engineering Degree to Create the Next Revolutionary Innovation

Many innovative and inventor type individuals will go out and get an engineering degree thinking that it is a necessity to come up with the most brilliant inventions. However, that is not exactly true, you see, often too much schooling can prevent creative thought.

Most of the revolutionary inventions and innovations of our time were not created by engineers. These inventions were created by entrepreneurial innovators that were trying to solve a problem and come up with a product or service which solved the needs and desires of potential future buyers.

Those innovators then went to engineers to get help in building such apparatuses. And those same engineers normally told them it wouldn’t work, or it wouldn’t fly. Undeterred these innovators, or doers would continue the process, crashing several prototypes until they came up with something that worked.

Now, this is not to say that engineering is not important, because it absolutely is and if you will consider that even the Wright brothers were bicycle mechanics, and somewhat engineers in their own right. Still, I can tell you that before my retirement, as an entrepreneur, we innovated and invented many new revolutionary concepts to our industry, and none of us had engineering degrees.

However, we knew what we wanted to make, what we wanted to do, and we knew, which questions to ask the engineers that helped us design it. Many of the top engineering schools in the country have been very wise in teaching creativity and innovation along side of engineering. This is the proper way to do it.

Believe me when I tell you that NASA could have never land astronauts on the moon without the creative geniuses, and innovative thinkers amongst their ranks of engineers. While an engineering degree can help you produce a revolutionary product, it is the creative genius mind that must first come up with the innovation.

You don’t need an engineering degree to do that, and yes, it can help, but you can also hire an engineer, or an engineering firm to assist you once your creative concept is cemented in your mind. Please consider this and fly your dreams.

Lance Winslow – Lance Winslow’s Bio. Lance Winslow believes if you want something, you need to make that call yourself; pc phone

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Latest Jobs That Don’t Need A College Degree News

JOHN CANNON: Free college not the answer
I am about to say something that I suspect will surprise many friends who know how firmly I believe that a good education is a key to success in life: I don't think making two years of community college free will enhance the cause of quality education …
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Is algebra necessary in schools?
The state Senate voted 34-16 on Tuesday to approve legislation that would, in theory, ban Georgia's state officials from adopting national education standards proposed by the U.S. government or other coalitions. (Photo: 13WMAZ) … "I think of annoying …
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Latest Jobs That Don’t Need A College Degree News

What could finally close the gender pay gap?
For instance, women are now more likely to have college degrees than men, but men continue to dominate so-called STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), which tend to pay more than other jobs. Yet the math scores of high school …
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Ending casualisation will not only benefit early career academics
What they probably don't realise is that most of the highly qualified experts who teach them face the same insecurity year in, year out. Earlier this month, a campaign … Yet, as Times Higher Education has reported (“'We're worth more': casual …
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Graduate Certificate Programs Offer Quick Path to Career Upgrade
An engineer who needs to enhance his or her bona fides in noise control engineering, for example, could get a certificate from Purdue University by taking master's-level courses in engineering acoustics and mechanical vibrations, plus two related …
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