Tag Archives: Degree

Mothers: Get Your Degree at a Junior College

To many people junior college isn’t “real” school. If you’re a hard-working mom, however, the junior college environment may be exactly what you’re looking for. There are a number of academic and personal benefits to attending a junior college, and these schools eagerly welcome high-achievers. With financial opportunity you could get the education you want and need. For a long time 2-year colleges have seemed like schools to go to in order to waste time and money. Strong course work, lower tuition and geographic nearness are three of the best characteristics of community colleges. The community college system is ideal for moms who don’t have a lot of time or extra money on their hands. Started in 2009, the Scholarships for Moms program helps to enroll moms in colleges and universities of all kinds. There are few better financial aid opportunities than a $ 5,000 grant. The most important reason for many who attend a community college is the lower costs. Even with a $ 5,000 Pell Grant for a mother, saving money is always important. Consider that most college and university educations cost tens of thousands of dollars, but that isn’t so at junior colleges. There is much competition at liberal arts colleges for scholarships, but at many junior colleges high SAT scores and GPA almost guarantee a significant scholarship. A scholarship based on achievement is a huge incentive for many ambitious teenage mothers. Even with some expenses paid, the scholarship for moms can be used to pay for travel expenses, childcare and other school-related expenses. Increasingly, the curriculums at 2-year colleges are becoming more rigorous and offering more academic opportunities. A 2002 New York Times article found that 168 junior colleges have an honors program. Certain community college are beginning to mirror the syllabi at big-name colleges and universities. One 2-year school in the Times article encouraged and provided opportunity to study abroad in various places. The exciting variety of classes that a student can take will only help as he or she moves on to a 4-year school or into the working world. Attending a community college is made even more accessible for mothers who have earned a Pell Grant. The local college scene is a great place to make use of the $ 5,000 Pell Grant for moms. Junior colleges are fully capable of producing capable professionals who move into work or go on to get an advanced degree. A quality associate degree could lead to great career development.

So what’s holding you back? Take advantage of a ,000 scholarship drawing. Registration is free if you visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

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Mothers: Earn Your Degree At A Junior College

To many people junior college isn’t “real” school. For women with children, 2-year colleges actually have some tremendous advantages. Community colleges welcome bright students, and they have many benefits to offer. Financial aid is a common concern, but taking care of that is part of the package as well.

In the past the dominating perception has been that community colleges are for slackers or students who cant get admitted to real colleges. In reality many community colleges offer stimulating classes and often are right in your back yard. Young mothers who recently graduated high school obviously benefit from this situation, but so also do older mothers. Started in 2009, the Scholarships for Moms program helps to enroll moms in colleges and universities of all kinds. A $ 5,000 award to return to school is a huge incentive.

Financial savings are a significant factor of attending junior college. Moms who apply for a $ 5,000 grant certainly want to be cost conscious when going to school. Consider that most college and university educations cost tens of thousands of dollars, but that isn’t so at junior colleges. Having high SAT scores and GPA could result in a 2-year college paying through scholarships for that bright student to come to that school. A young mom could greatly benefit from being rewarded for her efforts in high school. A mother can take care of a number of necessary expenses using the $ 5,000 Pell Grant.

At junior colleges many students will find that they have study opportunities that are similar to 4-year schools. In 2002, the New York Times reported that more than 150 junior colleges have an honors section. Many also have study opportunities that reflect the opportunities at big liberal arts universities. Some schools with high achievement have been able to develop unique study abroad opportunities. All of these diverse courses and study opportunities expand students knowledge and help them enroll in 4-year colleges.

With scholarships for mothers, junior colleges are even more in reach than before. The local college scene is a great place to make use of the $ 5,000 Pell Grant for moms. Junior colleges are fully capable of producing capable professionals who move into work or go on to get an advanced degree. A 2-year associate degree is a great start to sound career development.

So what’s holding you back? Take advantage of a ,000 scholarship drawing. Registration is free if you visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

Find More Jobs That Don’t Need A College Degree Articles

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Moms: Get Your Degree at a 2-Year College

To many people junior college isn’t “real” school. Trying to attend school as a mother, however, means seriously looking into junior college options. There are a number of academic and personal benefits to attending a junior college, and these schools eagerly welcome high-achievers. Earning money to go to school is also an important but not impossible task. It’s a big myth that junior colleges aren’t for serious students. Strong course work, lower tuition and geographic nearness are three of the best characteristics of community colleges. Mothers who work could especially benefit from the 2-year college system. For moms who want to gain knowledge and degrees, the Obama scholarships for mothers are a strong financial benefit. A $ 5,000 award to return to school is a huge incentive. One of the biggest attractions to junior colleges is the financial savings. Moms who apply for a $ 5,000 grant certainly want to be cost conscious when going to school. The tuition at a community college is tens of thousands of dollars cheaper than big 4-year universities. There is much competition at liberal arts colleges for scholarships, but at many junior colleges high SAT scores and GPA almost guarantee a significant scholarship. A young mom could greatly benefit from being rewarded for her efforts in high school. Travel expenses and housing are just a couple of the other necessary expenses that could be covered with the $ 5,000 grant. At junior colleges many students will find that they have study opportunities that are similar to 4-year schools. Many 2-year schools give their high-achieving students the chance to enroll in the school’s honors program. Many also have study opportunities that reflect the opportunities at big liberal arts universities. A good example is the junior college that offers study credits in places such as London and French Polynesia. The benefit is that students gain a broader perspective of the world, and colleges are able to attract more students. Grants for ambitious moms will certainly make junior colleges even more attainable. The $ 5,000 grants for moms can ensure that junior college is within reach. Going to school in a less pressurized environment can greatly affect performance and make achievement seem more attainable. A 2-year associate degree is a great start to sound career development.

So what’s holding you back? Get free degree options, whether online or on-campus, and compare over 1900 colleges and universities, who have a need for students like you. Visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

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Prior To Making The Decision – Life Without A College Degree

I run an executive recruiting firm meaning that I only recruit employers who are at a base salary of $ 100,000 and above and I’m writing this article because I hope you want to be at this level someday. I will be straight about it; you will not succeed if you don’t finish college. Yes, there are people like Bill Gates who dropped out of college and had a huge career, reinventing the way the world works. However, would you move to Los Angeles just because Nicholas Cage got paid 10 million dollars last film? Here are some reasons, both obvious and underlying, as to why you have no choice when it comes to finishing your degree.

1. You will not be viable on the open job market. If I think somebody is right for a job, I send them to my client. However, I always have to put on the resume “did not finish school.” It is my obligation to my clients and most decline to interview the candidate. I have to really push to get someone who did not finish college into these interviews. Though, with so many good applicants applying who have their degree, why would I continue to pitch the single person who does not?
Yes. Without finishing school, you can be successful. However, when trying to get into an executive level position, do you want a “did not finish school” tag on your resume? If you don’t finish school, don’t bother thinking about this question because 99% of the time, it won’t be a concern to you. You won’t make it to that level. Your career counselors aren’t lying to you.

2. Your writing skills will lack. Writing is so important these days. Nobody likes to speak on the phone anymore. Everything is done via email. In business, you not only have to formulate really strong ideas, but you have to be able to convey them in a succinct, clear manner. Plus, for marketing purposes, writing is getting more and more important.

3. You will get the most miserable jobs – we’re talking subpar miserable. Throughout college I had a job as a doorman at a 5th Avenue, very plush Manhattan building. For some reason, it did not have automatic elevators. My job was to take these people up and down the elevator all day. The only reason I got this job was through a connection from high school and it paid great. On the flip side, imagine going to work every day and not being able to use your creativity. Your brain shuts off and when that happens, you become complacent. Complacency is the enemy of success.

4. It can give people leverage over you. Let’s say that you were up against somebody for a promotion and they were a real you know what. Any time they want to, they make a snide remark, in a roundabout way regarding your education. Don’t give people an excuse to believe they are somehow better than you.

5. You will feel uncomfortable in social situations. For the rest of your life, you are not going to be part of a club that most adults are in or the weight your professional opinion holds. Now, when you get older, what college you went to is going to come up in conversations from time to time and you will feel embarrassed. Additionally, people will hold your comments and opinions with far less weight. It’s not fair, but it’s the real world. In 99% of situations, who would you take a stock tip from – a MBA or college drop-out.

6. You will feel uncomfortable in business situations. Some people like to be uninteresting, annoying, etc., and they do this via bragging about the college they went to. If they were as important as they claimed they were, they probably would not have time to go on about college in New Haven. However, always be polite and never point this out. It’s a fact of life that you are going to run into these people.

7. For the rest of your life, you will feel as if you did not complete nor accomplish what so many others have. I can promise you that this one will stick. I own my business and, if I didn’t finish school, I would regret it. I thought about it at times. I’m glad I stuck through as the work which I have done is now part of who I am.
8. Good Will Hunting is just a movie. If I were to pick 2,000 U.S. universities and we were to be how many janitors at each of those colleges is fit to be an executive, how many would you say there are?

Ken Sundheim runs KAS Placement, a sales and marketing recruitment agency with multiple divisions: Recruitment Agencies Sales Staffing Agencies with a group that handles New York Recruitment Agencies New York Staffing Agencies and the DC marketing division Recruitment Agencies Washington DC Marketing Recruiters

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What Jobs Fit With a Liberal Arts Degree?

If you were to consult the statisticians on jobs and job preparation, you would find that a liberal arts degree is does not meet the precise needs of any job, but that a wide assortment of careers are well-served by the depth and breadth of the studies included in a liberal arts major. 

Fortunately there are a number of other job sources for students whose degree qualifies them as educated in the liberal arts.  Generally, the value of this degree is the perspective that comes with an education that includes exposure to history, great literature, anthropology, the social sciences, psychology and perhaps a foreign language. The study of liberal arts may not provide you with technical skills of any sort other than writing, but it does provide a worldly perspective that can serve you well in a number of business environments.

Human resources.  Within the realm of human resources (HR), there are professionals who focus on interviewing potential employees, on employee training, on the placement of new employees and on recruitment.  These positions all require a certain degree of insight about both individuals and groups of people.  Human resource directors are known to consider liberal arts graduates as potential candidates for these positions due to their broad perspective.
Advertising account executives.  This is an entry level position in many ad agencies, so applicants aren’t expected to grasp all of the strategy and tactical thought that is put into servicing an advertising client.  They are expected to present themselves well, to be able to grasp quickly the specifics of a particular step or series of steps in the daily management of an account, and to be able to communicate with the client clearly, concisely and pleasantly.  Liberal arts majors are often applicants for these positions.
Copywriters and editors.  The college degrees most closely associated with these fields are journalism and English.  However many employers are looking for people versed in the liberal arts, people whose perspective reaches beyond the use of the printed word.  Of course mastery of editing protocols and language use is also mandatory, but a degree in the field is not.
Paralegals.  This is another position where many employers appreciate the value of a liberal arts background.  Not many paralegals are being hired today without formal training in the field, but that can be accomplished with an associate’s degree or a certification course.  Attorneys want paralegals that will be able to interact with clients, court clerks and other attorneys comfortably.  Writing skills are important but so are the social skills, the ability to analyze and to think clearly.
Marketing and sales.  There are a lot of degrees in business today that focus on marketing.  However for entry level positions, particularly in sales, it’s the personal skills and self confidence that are most important.  Students who have been exposed to all of the academic disciplines wrapped into a liberal arts degree are more likely to be able to converse on many subjects that new employees whose college career was focused on marketing methods, advertising tactics and the endless permutations of web-based promotions.

Bob Hartzell writes about careers for GetDegrees.com. On the website you’ll find comprehensive information about liberal arts degrees as well as information about educational opportunities for hundreds of other professions.

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Finding A Job Without A Degree

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts these occupations, which require only on-the-job training or work experience, will grow rapidly in the next decade. If fact, in is expected that they will grow faster than all other occupations with similar requirements.

Though the average wages of each profession are a fair prediction of what you could get paid in a similar position, salary will vary depending on where you live and who your employer is. Other factors that may alter your salary include level of experience and training.

There are many career opportunities across the country in many different fields. This means that you have the opportunity to find the right career path for you without investing tens-of-thousands of dollars and four years of your life in a major that you find you do not even like.

Home health aides provide basic care for people with disabilities, chronic illnesses, cognitive impairments, or who have age-related problems. Employment of home health aides is projected to grow approximately 50 percent through 2018.

Home health aides earned a median annual salary of $ 20,460 and a median hourly wage of $ 9.84 in 2008. Home care aides, also known as personal care aides or companions, help elderly or disabled clients with activities of daily living.

Their tasks include assisting with personal hygiene, meal preparation, laundry, and housekeeping. There is expected to be a 46 percent increase in the employment of home care aides through 2018.

Home care aides earned a median annual salary of $ 19,180 and median hourly wages of $ 9.22 in 2008. Physical therapist aides, also known as physical therapy aides, help make therapy sessions productive.

Employment of physical therapist aides is expected to increase by 36 percent through 2018. Physical therapist aides earned a median annual salary of $ 23,760 and median hourly wages of $ 11.42.

Dental assistants perform duties that may include patient care, laboratory work, and office work. There is expected to be a 36 percent growth in employment of dental assistants through 2018.

Dental assistants earned a median hourly wage of $ 15.57 and a median annual salary of $ 32,380 in 2008. Medical assistants perform administrative duties in physicians’ offices; though they may also perform some clinical duties as allowed by individual state laws.

Employment in this field is expected to grow by 34 percent through 2018. Medical assistants earned median hourly wages of $ 13.60 and a median annual salary of $ 28,300 in 2008.

Self-enrichment teachers instruct students in a variety of subjects that generally are not part of a required curriculum. Students who take self-enrichment classes are interested in learning about these subjects for self-improvement or for fun.

Employment in this field is expected to grow by 32 percent through 2018. Self-enrichment teachers earned median hourly wages of $ 17.17 and a median annual salary of $ 35,720 in 2008.

A compliance officer’s job is to make sure an entity is conforming with, or eligible for, contractual obligations, government regulations, laws, or licenses and permits. There is expected to be a 31 percent increase in the employment of compliance officers through 2018.

Compliance officers earned median hourly wages of $ 23.50 and a median annual salary of $ 48,890 in 2008. Occupational therapist aides prepare materials and equipment used during patients’ occupational therapy sessions; and they also perform clerical duties.

Employment in this field is expected to grow by 31 percent through 2018. Occupational therapist aides’ median annual earnings were $ 26,960 and their median hourly wages were $ 12.96 in 2008.

Pharmacy technicians assist pharmacists with the preparation of prescription medications for customers. They perform tasks that range from receiving written prescriptions to counting pills and labeling bottles.

It is expected that there will be a 31 percent growth in employment in this field through 2018. Pharmacy technicians earned median hourly wages of $ 13.32 and a median annual salary of $ 27,710 in 2008.

Medical secretaries perform clerical duties in medical offices, utilizing their knowledge of medical terminology, insurance rules and medical billing procedures. Employment in this field is expected to grow by 27 percent through 2018.

Tommy Greene is a certified CNA and has worked in health care for the past 15 years. He has great advice on what education is necessary to become a Medical Assistant Utah.

Contact Info:
Tommy Greene
TommyGreene09@gmail.com
www.coleholland.com

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Mothers: Earn A Degree At A Community College

Community college is often the punchline to jokes about college. A 2-year college education could be exactly what a single or stay-at-home mom needs. There are a number of academic and personal benefits to attending a junior college, and these schools eagerly welcome high-achievers. With financial opportunity you could get the education you want and need.

It’s a big myth that junior colleges aren’t for serious students. In reality many community colleges offer stimulating classes and often are right in your back yard. The flexibility and opportunity are great for moms who want to go to school. Started in 2009, the Scholarships for Moms program helps to enroll moms in colleges and universities of all kinds. Earning $ 5,000 to help pay for school is a very attractive offer.

School costs like tuition can be extremely high, but one of the the best things about 2-year colleges is the relatively low cost of attendance. Even having a $ 5,000 award doesn’t take away from the wisdom of trying to save money. The tuition at a community college is tens of thousands of dollars cheaper than big 4-year universities. In fact many high school graduates with a high SAT score can get a full scholarship to go to junior college. A young mom could greatly benefit from being rewarded for her efforts in high school. A mother can take care of a number of necessary expenses using the $ 5,000 Pell Grant.

Increasingly, the curriculums at 2-year colleges are becoming more rigorous and offering more academic opportunities. According to a 2002 New York Times article, 168 community colleges maintain honors programs. Chances to study broad interests are also part of the developing community college landscape. A good example is the junior college that offers study credits in places such as London and French Polynesia. The exciting variety of classes that a student can take will only help as he or she moves on to a 4-year school or into the working world.

With scholarships for mothers, junior colleges are even more in reach than before. Attending a junior college allows a mom to save some money even as she has the bonus of a $ 5,000 mom scholarship. These schools also allow a mom to prepare for a productive career in two years or a transfer to a 4-year college. On the path toward your career, a 2-year degree is a good first step.

So what’s holding you back? Take advantage of a ,000 scholarship drawing. Registration is free if you visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

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Moms: Get a Degree at a 2-Year College

To many people junior college isn’t “real” school. For women with children, 2-year colleges actually have some tremendous advantages. Both academically and personally junior colleges present a wealth of options. Chances for financial assistance increase the potential for community colleges to attract quality students. It’s a big myth that junior colleges aren’t for serious students. The truth is that junior colleges are a welcoming environment that is usually close to home, relatively inexpensive and full of challenging course offerings. Young mothers who recently graduated high school obviously benefit from this situation, but so also do older mothers. Championed by President Obama in 2009, the Grants for Moms incentive is an effort to help more moms enroll in junior colleges and other schools of their choice. Getting $ 5,000 can go a long way toward earning a professional degree. Perhaps the biggest reason many people choose community college is to save money. Being smart with money is a top priority for most students but especially women with children. A $ 5,000 grant doesn’t change that. At a 4-year institution the cost of attendance could be 30,000 a year or more. Having high SAT scores and GPA could result in a 2-year college paying through scholarships for that bright student to come to that school. A scholarship based on achievement is a huge incentive for many ambitious teenage mothers. A student can use the mom grant to pay for any school or school-related costs. The course offerings at many community colleges now more closely resemble those at traditional 4-year institutions. Many 2-year schools give their high-achieving students the chance to enroll in the school’s honors program. Many also have study opportunities that reflect the opportunities at big liberal arts universities. One 2-year school in the Times article encouraged and provided opportunity to study abroad in various places. Since junior colleges are state- and locally-funded, it helps them as well when they offer intriguing courses and can attract top students. Attending a community college is made even more accessible for mothers who have earned a Pell Grant. Even as they benefit from a $ 5,000 grant, mothers can reap the financial savings benefits of going to a small local college. Going to school in a less pressurized environment can greatly affect performance and make achievement seem more attainable. A quality associate degree could lead to great career development.

So what’s holding you back? Take advantage of a ,000 scholarship drawing. Registration is free if you visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

Related Jobs That Don’t Need A College Degree Articles

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Mothers: Earn a Degree at a 2-Year College

To many people junior college isn’t “real” school. For women with children, 2-year colleges actually have some tremendous advantages. Personal benefits and academic challenges are part of the package for smart students who want to earn a degree. Chances for financial assistance increase the potential for community colleges to attract quality students. In the past the dominating perception has been that community colleges are for slackers or students who can’t get admitted to “real” colleges. There are actually some very enticing benefits to go to these schools, including the lower tuition costs. Young mothers who recently graduated high school obviously benefit from this situation, but so also do older mothers. Championed by President Obama in 2009, the Grants for Moms incentive is an effort to help more moms enroll in junior colleges and other schools of their choice. Getting $ 5,000 can go a long way toward earning a professional degree. One of the biggest attractions to junior colleges is the financial savings. Even having a $ 5,000 award doesn’t take away from the wisdom of trying to save money. Usually the tuition and fees at a junior college are more than 50% less expensive than many colleges and universities. Furthermore, community colleges frequently offer full-ride scholarships to high school students with high standardized test scores and GPA. Teen mothers who performed well in high school should definitely take note of this. Even with some expenses paid, the scholarship for moms can be used to pay for travel expenses, childcare and other school-related expenses. At junior colleges many students will find that they have study opportunities that are similar to 4-year schools. In 2002, the New York Times reported that more than 150 junior colleges have an honors section. The standard teachings at 4-year schools are increasingly becoming the templates for smaller community colleges. Some schools with high achievement have been able to develop unique study abroad opportunities. All of these diverse courses and study opportunities expand students’ knowledge and help them enroll in 4-year colleges. Grants for ambitious moms will certainly make junior colleges even more attainable. The local college scene is a great place to make use of the $ 5,000 Pell Grant for moms. Going to school in a less pressurized environment can greatly affect performance and make achievement seem more attainable. Earning an associate degree is a smart choice on the road to being a professional.

So what’s holding you back? Take advantage of a ,000 scholarship drawing. Registration is free if you visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

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Mothers: Get A Degree At A 2-year College

To many people junior college isn’t “real” school. For busy moms community college can be a wonderful idea. Two-year colleges present many interesting possibilities for gaining an education. Add in a financial advantage or two and your education is within reach.

It’s a big myth that junior colleges aren’t for serious students. The truth is that junior colleges are a welcoming environment that is usually close to home, relatively inexpensive and full of challenging course offerings. This is perfect for young moms who are recently out of high school as well as older working or stay-at-home moms who want to return to school. Championed by President Obama in 2009, the Grants for Moms incentive is an effort to help more moms enroll in junior colleges and other schools of their choice. The $ 5,000 grant is a huge bonus for going to college.

One of the biggest attractions to junior colleges is the financial savings. Being smart with money is a top priority for most students but especially women with children. A $ 5,000 grant doesn’t change that. The tuition at a community college is tens of thousands of dollars cheaper than big 4-year universities. In fact many high school graduates with a high SAT score can get a full scholarship to go to junior college. A young mom could greatly benefit from being rewarded for her efforts in high school. A student can use the mom grant to pay for any school or school-related costs.

At many schools the gap is closing between the classes that 2-year colleges offer and those that are offered at big liberal arts universities. Honors programs at colleges are often a symbol of success, and a 2002 New York Times report found that many junior colleges offer these programs. The standard teachings at 4-year schools are increasingly becoming the templates for smaller community colleges. Some schools allow students to study subjects like philosophy and cultural art in places around the world. The benefit is that students gain a broader perspective of the world, and colleges are able to attract more students.

With scholarships for mothers, junior colleges are even more in reach than before. Attending a junior college allows a mom to save some money even as she has the bonus of a $ 5,000 mom scholarship. Community colleges can be great training grounds for attendance at 4-year colleges as well as for entering the work force. On the path toward your career, a 2-year degree is a good first step.

So what’s holding you back? Take advantage of a ,000 scholarship drawing. Registration is free if you visit http://www.scholarshipsformomsfinder.info/

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